Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops - an update!

weirdthingsinbookshops:


Folks! It’s been two years (two years!!) since the release of ‘Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops' and a year since the release of its sequel 'More Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops.’ Time flies, and all that jazz.

Y’all have been messaging me, asking if people still stay crazy…

151 must visit writing resources

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

An exhaustive overview of interesting writing resources

I wrote a book. It sucked. I wrote nine more books. They sucked, too. Meanwhile, I read every single thing I could find on publishing and writing, went to conferences, joined professional organizations, hooked up with fellow writers in critique groups, and didn’t give up. Then I wrote one more book.

Beth Revis (via observando)

(via yeahwriters)

Point of View - The Complexities

writingbox:

On Tuesday, we looked at the basics of point of view; but there’s far more to it than simply choosing between 1st, 2nd and 3rd POVs.

The POV choice you make for your story will be based on a number of different factors, and will result in a number of different effects. It’s an…

amandaonwriting:

Using Myths for Writing Prompts
Writing prompts are an excellent way to stay in good writing shape. We post a daily writing prompt on our Facebook page. It is also available on our Creative Blog. 

If you’re looking for some inspiration, you may enjoy an article I wrote last year about using Lyrics as Writing Prompts. I am always looking for new writing exercises, and I wanted to explore the concept of myths as prompts. I think this could be a great exercise for your writing group.

What is a myth?
A myth is a traditional, usually ancient story involving supernatural beings, ancestors, or heroes. It is used to explain aspects of the natural world or to show the psychology, customs, or ideals of a society. Myths exist in every culture across the globe. Examples include Eros and Psyche, the Myth of Creation, Daedalus and Iccarus,Noah and the Great Flood, the myth of Arthur and Camelot, and The Rain Queen.

Why don’t you write a myth using one of these ideas as inspiration?

by Amanda Patterson

amandaonwriting:

Using Myths for Writing Prompts

Writing prompts are an excellent way to stay in good writing shape. We post a daily writing prompt on our Facebook page. It is also available on our Creative Blog
If you’re looking for some inspiration, you may enjoy an article I wrote last year about using Lyrics as Writing Prompts. I am always looking for new writing exercises, and I wanted to explore the concept of myths as prompts. I think this could be a great exercise for your writing group.
What is a myth?
A myth is a traditional, usually ancient story involving supernatural beings, ancestors, or heroes. It is used to explain aspects of the natural world or to show the psychology, customs, or ideals of a society. Myths exist in every culture across the globe. Examples include Eros and Psyche, the Myth of CreationDaedalus and Iccarus,Noah and the Great Flood, the myth of Arthur and Camelot, and The Rain Queen.
Why don’t you write a myth using one of these ideas as inspiration?

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

(Source: ladysima, via amandaonwriting)

Quotable - Anne Frank, born 12 June 1929, died early March 1945
The Top 12 Anne Frank Quotes

Quotable - Anne Frank, born 12 June 1929, died early March 1945

The Top 12 Anne Frank Quotes

(Source: amandaonwriting)

yeahwriters:

5 Books on Writing That Every Writer Should Read
To be a better writer, there are really only things that you need to do: Read, and write. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t read about being a writer, and that having a well-rounded understanding of how writing “works” isn’t beneficial.
These 5 books were all assigned to me as a creative writing undergrad, and all have pieces of wisdom in them that have etched themselves so thoroughly into my brain that I feel like they’re all floating over my head while I’m writing.
I specifically chose these because they aren’t all just saying “here’s how I write, you should do it too”—the topics of these books are very diverse!
1. Reading Like A Writer by Francine Prose: Like I said, the best thing you can do to be a better writer is read. But what does that mean? What should you read? Francine Prose (yes, that is her real last name, if you can even believe it!) helps you answer those questions, and shows how looking for certain things while you read and reread can strengthen your own writing. Check it!
2. On Writing by Stephen King: This is the one book on my list that is saying “here’s how I write, you should too”. But Stephen King is basically the most prolific writer ever, so I was happy to listen to his advice. Two points of his really stuck with me: 1. Adverbs are lazy and 2. Sometimes the best thing you can do for a story is put it down for a long time—like, 6 months or a year—and come back to it with eyes so fresh that it’s like you’re editing someone else’s story. I’d be interested to know what points of his sticks with you guys!
3. Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott: I posted about this the other day, but this book is like my writing Bible. In fact, a friend of mine who doesn’t even write got to reading it, and he loved it, too. Basically if you’re a human with a goal, this book will help you. And Anne Lamott writes kinda like this wise, kind mother who isn’t afraid to also tell you what’s up. Whereas a lot of other books on writing are about the actual storytelling, I like this book because it’s more about the writer’s “lifestyle”. Go get it now so that we can gush together!
4. The Philosophy of Composition by Edgar Allan Poe: This is actually just an essay, but considering that Poe is often credited with being the inventor of the modern short story, I had to include it on this list. It’s in this essay that Poe famously defined a short story as one that can be told in one sitting. Whereas King’s On Writing is really “zoomed in” on topics like word choice, this essay is a high level, theoretical piece on what a story actually is. You can get it for 99 cents on Kindle, or, even better, read it as part of a collection of all of his stories… ugh, they’re SO good!!!
5. Elements of Style by Strunk & White: I cannot tell you how often I’ve received this little book as a gift—for high school graduation, for college graduation, and for many Christmases and birthdays. But it’s all good because it is kinda essential for a writer to have. Elements of Style is all about—gasp!—grammar. (I should probably give it a read-through again so that I can re-center and remember my grammatical skillz, actually!) Also, there are some cute versions out now that make it seem less snore-fest-y—I really want this illustrated copy!
If you read any of these books and post quotes from them on your Tumblr, tag them #yeahwritebooks and I’ll reblog you!

yeahwriters:

5 Books on Writing That Every Writer Should Read

To be a better writer, there are really only things that you need to do: Read, and write. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t read about being a writer, and that having a well-rounded understanding of how writing “works” isn’t beneficial.

These 5 books were all assigned to me as a creative writing undergrad, and all have pieces of wisdom in them that have etched themselves so thoroughly into my brain that I feel like they’re all floating over my head while I’m writing.

I specifically chose these because they aren’t all just saying “here’s how I write, you should do it too”the topics of these books are very diverse!

1. Reading Like A Writer by Francine Prose: Like I said, the best thing you can do to be a better writer is read. But what does that mean? What should you read? Francine Prose (yes, that is her real last name, if you can even believe it!) helps you answer those questions, and shows how looking for certain things while you read and reread can strengthen your own writing. Check it!

2. On Writing by Stephen King: This is the one book on my list that is saying “here’s how I write, you should too”. But Stephen King is basically the most prolific writer ever, so I was happy to listen to his advice. Two points of his really stuck with me: 1. Adverbs are lazy and 2. Sometimes the best thing you can do for a story is put it down for a long timelike, 6 months or a yearand come back to it with eyes so fresh that it’s like you’re editing someone else’s story. I’d be interested to know what points of his sticks with you guys!

3. Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott: I posted about this the other day, but this book is like my writing Bible. In fact, a friend of mine who doesn’t even write got to reading it, and he loved it, too. Basically if you’re a human with a goal, this book will help you. And Anne Lamott writes kinda like this wise, kind mother who isn’t afraid to also tell you what’s up. Whereas a lot of other books on writing are about the actual storytelling, I like this book because it’s more about the writer’s “lifestyle”. Go get it now so that we can gush together!

4. The Philosophy of Composition by Edgar Allan Poe: This is actually just an essay, but considering that Poe is often credited with being the inventor of the modern short story, I had to include it on this list. It’s in this essay that Poe famously defined a short story as one that can be told in one sitting. Whereas King’s On Writing is really “zoomed in” on topics like word choice, this essay is a high level, theoretical piece on what a story actually is. You can get it for 99 cents on Kindle, or, even better, read it as part of a collection of all of his stories… ugh, they’re SO good!!!

5. Elements of Style by Strunk & White: I cannot tell you how often I’ve received this little book as a giftfor high school graduation, for college graduation, and for many Christmases and birthdays. But it’s all good because it is kinda essential for a writer to have. Elements of Style is all aboutgasp!grammar. (I should probably give it a read-through again so that I can re-center and remember my grammatical skillz, actually!) Also, there are some cute versions out now that make it seem less snore-fest-yI really want this illustrated copy!

If you read any of these books and post quotes from them on your Tumblr, tag them #yeahwritebooks and I’ll reblog you!

Penny Dreadful is making me want to re-read all the Victorian Gothic novels!

The Unreliable Narrator

fictionwritingtips:

To start off, here’s a list of unreliable narrators you might recognize:

  • Humbert Humbert, Lolita
  • Holden Caulfield, The Catcher in the Rye
  • Patrick Bateman, American Psycho
  • Alex, A Clockwork Orange
  • The Narrator, Fight Club

An unreliable narrator doesn’t…

babbyajumma:

msavignon:

He really gets me, you guys.

literally my entire “work day”

babbyajumma:

msavignon:

He really gets me, you guys.

literally my entire “work day”

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

I bought you books

Pick up line that will have me hook, line, and sinker (via bookwormbabe89)

(via thecaringconservative)

writingonthewa11s said: So as I'm writing my book, I know the beginning to my story and I know the end but I can't figure out what will happen in the middle of it. I need to create a good middle of my story thats is interesting and having it connect back to the end well.

fixyourwritinghabits:

These might help!

wordpainting:

They certainly do.

wordpainting:

They certainly do.