ilovereadingandwriting:

Just write…

ilovereadingandwriting:

Just write…

Free books: 100 legal sites to download literature | Just English

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(Source: addtoany.com)

Happy Birthday, Cicero, born 3 January 106 BC, died 7 December 43 BC
10 Quotes
For books are more than books, they are the life, the very heart and core of ages past, the reason why men worked and died, the essence and quintessence of their lives.
It is the peculiar quality of a fool to perceive the faults of others and to forget his own.
The more laws, the less justice.
What is morally wrong can never be advantageous, even when it enables you to make some gain that you believe to be to your advantage. The mere act of believing that some wrongful course of action constitutes an advantage is pernicious.
Times are bad. Children no longer obey their parents, and everyone is writing a book.
The wise are instructed by reason, average minds by experience, the stupid by necessity and the brute by instinct.
If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.
To study philosophy is nothing but to prepare one’s self to die.
Read at every wait; read at all hours; read within leisure; read in times of labour; read as one goes in; read as one goest out. The task of the educated mind is simply put: read to lead.
While there’s life, there’s hope.
Marcus Tullius Cicero was a Roman philosopher, politician, lawyer, orator, political theorist, consul and constitutionalist. He is known as one of Rome’s greatest prose stylists.
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write
Wise Words
Six mistakes mankind keeps making century after century:Believing that personal gain is made by crushing others;Worrying about things that cannot be changed or corrected;Insisting that a thing is impossible because we cannot accomplish it;Refusing to set aside trivial preferences;Neglecting development and refinement of the mind;Attempting to compel others to believe and live as we do.

Happy Birthday, Cicero, born 3 January 106 BC, died 7 December 43 BC

10 Quotes

  1. For books are more than books, they are the life, the very heart and core of ages past, the reason why men worked and died, the essence and quintessence of their lives.
  2. It is the peculiar quality of a fool to perceive the faults of others and to forget his own.
  3. The more laws, the less justice.
  4. What is morally wrong can never be advantageous, even when it enables you to make some gain that you believe to be to your advantage. The mere act of believing that some wrongful course of action constitutes an advantage is pernicious.
  5. Times are bad. Children no longer obey their parents, and everyone is writing a book.
  6. The wise are instructed by reason, average minds by experience, the stupid by necessity and the brute by instinct.
  7. If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.
  8. To study philosophy is nothing but to prepare one’s self to die.
  9. Read at every wait; read at all hours; read within leisure; read in times of labour; read as one goes in; read as one goest out. The task of the educated mind is simply put: read to lead.
  10. While there’s life, there’s hope.

Marcus Tullius Cicero was a Roman philosopher, politician, lawyer, orator, political theorist, consul and constitutionalist. He is known as one of Rome’s greatest prose stylists.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Wise Words

Six mistakes mankind keeps making century after century:
Believing that personal gain is made by crushing others;
Worrying about things that cannot be changed or corrected;
Insisting that a thing is impossible because we cannot accomplish it;
Refusing to set aside trivial preferences;
Neglecting development and refinement of the mind;
Attempting to compel others to believe and live as we do.

(via amandaonwriting)

Anonymous asked: I'm having difficulty deciding what tense and what person to write in and I want to decide before writing much more because changing it is tedious. What are the pro/cons of present vs. past tense and are they more useful in certain genres (i.e. I'm trying to write a thriller/suspense/horror with a lot of character reflection.) What about 1st person vs. 3rd person?

prompts-and-pointers:

You’re probably somewhat familiar with the past tense, so I’ll keep it brief. With the past tense, you really have the ability to reflect on what’s happening in your story. Your narrator is given lots of time to muse, deliberate and ponder. If you’re planning on reflecting a lot, then past tense may be the best choice. Of course reflecting in the present tense could be an interesting challenge (if you’re up to it).

However, it isn’t all sunshine and unicorn droppings; there are also pitfalls for writing in the past tense. Some moments can drag, especially when you get into detail. You’ve probably read a book (or fan fiction) where the author goes on and on about something you don’t particularly care about (clothing, setting, physical appearance, and clothing). It can get monotonous. Of course this pitfall can be done well and you can give necessary background information to your readers.

With the present tense, it’s a bit little more difficult to give convey this vital background knowledge. There is no omniscient, third-person voice that fills the reader in on what’s going on. It’s all up to the narrator. So you’ll either need a really smart narrator or intentionally give your audience limited information (which can add extra flavor to the storytelling). So as most writing advice goes: it can be good, if it is done well. I think the key to writing in the present tense is being aware of its deficiencies and to keep them in mind while writing.

If you don’t want to commit fully to one or the other, you could also switch off between them. Be careful not to confuse your readers when doing this. When you do switch tenses, do it strategically. For example, in a novel that’s primarily written in the past tense, the protagonist can be looking back at a moment and narrate it in present tense to emphasis their mindset and underscore their inability to move on from a painful memory. You can also switch tenses when changing between view points, giving each of your protagonists distinct voices. I only listed a handful of options, but there are endless possibilities for combining tenses to add spice to your story.

A wonderful chart that I found on Ava Jae’s blog (Writability), shows how “closeness” (intimacy between the reader and protagonist) can change with different tenses and view points. Closeness is particularly important in creating empathy between the audience and narrator.

image

In the book On Writing Fiction by Davis Jauss, he discusses seven advantages and ten disadvantages to writing in the present tense in his chapter, “Remembrance of Things Present: Present Tense in Contemporary Fiction.”

Positive Aspects of Present Tense:

  1. Immediacy, events are happening to the narrator at the same time they are happening to the reader. The reader can easily get lost in the story.
  2. Timing is more realistic. You can’t skip forward a decade within one paragraph like you do with past tense.
  3. Shifting to present tense in a story can have a striking effect by making a text stand out more. It has a highlighting affect on the material. Dramatic and exciting moments become even more dramatic and exciting.
  4. It is good for writing dreams, since present tense can be disorienting. Disorienting can be good at conveying the befuddling experience of dreaming.
  5. If your protagonist is someone who lives in the present (a character who doesn’t reflect on the past), the present tense can be a tool for emphasizing that trait.
  6. It can signify how a memory is still significant for the protagonist whenever they remember it. To achieve this you’d need to be writing the rest of the book (or most of it) in the past tense.
  7. You only have four tenses: the simple present, the present, the present progressive and simple past/present. Making it simpler to keep track of.

Disadvantages of Writing Present Tense:

  1. It’s harder to manipulate time. Since you are restricted to the present. It’s not necessarily impossible to move through time but it is definitely harder.
  2. There is also the difficulty of creating a character with depth and complexity.
  3. You have a more difficult time creating a feeling of dread and tension, since everything is happening rapidly. 
  4. It causes confusion in timing, especially when referring to past events.
  5. There is less variety in terms of the pacing. You can’t randomly skip forward six years like you can with the past tense.
  6. There’s more of a focus on acton and dialogue versus the meaning of events. There’s also less focus on setting and character description.
  7. In contradiction to number six, there is sometimes too much focus on the character’s inner monologue.
  8. The present tense can create boring plot points since it’s usually used as a tool to add to the realism of a story. This is especially true for when a writer is relaying events to the reader through the characters thoughts.
  9. In order to describe events in present tense, you have to actually describe them rather than the protagonist’s feelings and reactions. So there is a conflict of interest between trying to tell the story and portraying the realistic reaction of your character.
  10. It’s strange to narrate to no one, which is essentially what present tense narration is (at least in first person).

* This wasn’t listed in the book but I thought it was worth mentioning. While I was researching online, I found a common complaint among authors and readers about the present tense: it was annoying to read. I don’t think that it’s actually the tense that is annoying but more the fact that it’s noticeable. Most of us are used to reading in the past tense and when we see the present tense, it stand out.

This list refers specifically for a first person view point. I believe third person present tense is rarer. You shouldn’t let that discourage you if it’s something you want to do. And for a better understanding of present tenses’ advantages and disadvantages (and other fantastic tips on fiction), I’d highly encourage reading the rest of the book!

I can’t say which tense would be the best for you, but I’d suggest weighing the pros and cons in your head and thinking of which would best aid you in creating suspense/terror/thrill in your story. So I guess the question I’ll leave you with is: would you prefer more reflection or action?

P.S. I realize I’ve generalized a lot and I’d like to add that there are exceptions to every rule! Past tense doesn’t necessarily mean boring and present tense isn’t always a confusing mess.

- Leyla

Sources:

Advantages of writing in past tense

Pitfalls on writing in present tense

The guardian on present tense

Grammar girl on past verses present tense

Some problems you can run into when writing in present tense

acteon-carolsfeld:

Seven Steps to the Perfect Story

From structure and plot to heroes and characters, your story must have everything in place if it’s to connect with the reader. Follow our guide to storytelling success.

There’s an eighth step most of these things tend to miss. It’s called practice. One would assume that such a step follows without needing a mention, but I think it’s important enough to deserve bringing to notice.

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

nprbooks:

penamerican:

NSA Surveillance Drives U.S Writers to Self-Censor
Read the full report here

In October 2013, PEN partnered with independent researchers at the FDR Group to conduct a survey of over 520 American writers to better understand the specific ways in which awareness of far-reaching surveillance programs influences writers’ thinking, research, and writing. The results of this survey—the beginning of a broader investigation into the harms of surveillance—substantiate PEN’s concerns: writers are not only overwhelmingly worried about government surveillance, but are engaging in self-censorship as a result. 


Back in August, the writer William T. Vollmann raised concerns about government surveillance with a Harper's article in which he revealed that he had been watched by the FBI. Vollmann wrote, “I was accused, secretly. I was spied on … I have no redress. To be sure, I am not a victim; my worries are not for me, but for the American Way of Life.”
More book news here.

nprbooks:

penamerican:

NSA Surveillance Drives U.S Writers to Self-Censor

Read the full report here

In October 2013, PEN partnered with independent researchers at the FDR Group to conduct a survey of over 520 American writers to better understand the specific ways in which awareness of far-reaching surveillance programs influences writers’ thinking, research, and writing. The results of this survey—the beginning of a broader investigation into the harms of surveillance—substantiate PEN’s concerns: writers are not only overwhelmingly worried about government surveillance, but are engaging in self-censorship as a result.

Back in August, the writer William T. Vollmann raised concerns about government surveillance with a Harper's article in which he revealed that he had been watched by the FBI. Vollmann wrote, “I was accused, secretly. I was spied on … I have no redress. To be sure, I am not a victim; my worries are not for me, but for the American Way of Life.”

More book news here.

(via the-liberty-republican)

The Letter That Changed the Course of Modern Fiction - The Daily Beast

A hundred years ago, Ezra Pound wrote a letter to the struggling and largely unpublished James Joyce offering to help him—and set in motion a literary revolution.

(Source: addtoany.com)

She was fascinated with words. To her, words were things of beauty, each like a magical powder or potion that could be combined with other words to create powerful spells.

Dean Koontz (via listentothestories)

72 of the Best Quotes for Writers | WritersDigest.com

Here’s a roundup of some of our favorite quotes for writers, and quotes about writing.

(Source: addtoany.com)

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Emily Dickinson, born 10 December 1830, died 15 May 1886
10 Quotes
We meet no Stranger, but Ourself
To live is so startling it leaves little time for anything else.
Hope is the thing with feathers - That perches in the soul.
If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can ever warm me, I know that is poetry.
Forever is composed of nows.
I know nothing in the world that has as much power as a word. Sometimes I write one, and I look at it, until it begins to shine.
I don’t profess to be profound; but I do lay claim to common sense.
Behaviour is what a man does, not what he thinks, feels, or believes.
A word is dead when it is said, some say. I say it just begins to live that day.
That it will never come again is what makes life so sweet.
Dickinson was an American poet who is acknowledged as one of the most original and influential poets of the 19th Century.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Emily Dickinson, born 10 December 1830, died 15 May 1886

10 Quotes

  1. We meet no Stranger, but Ourself
  2. To live is so startling it leaves little time for anything else.
  3. Hope is the thing with feathers - That perches in the soul.
  4. If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can ever warm me, I know that is poetry.
  5. Forever is composed of nows.
  6. I know nothing in the world that has as much power as a word. Sometimes I write one, and I look at it, until it begins to shine.
  7. I don’t profess to be profound; but I do lay claim to common sense.
  8. Behaviour is what a man does, not what he thinks, feels, or believes.
  9. A word is dead when it is said, some say. I say it just begins to live that day.
  10. That it will never come again is what makes life so sweet.

Dickinson was an American poet who is acknowledged as one of the most original and influential poets of the 19th Century.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

(via wordpainting)

Famous Novelists on Symbolism in Their Work and Whether It Was Intentional | Mental Floss

It was 1963, and 16-year-old Bruce McAllister was sick of symbol-hunting in English class. Rather than quarrel with his teacher, he went straight to the source: McAllister mailed a crude, four-question survey to 150 novelists, asking if they intentionally planted symbolism in their work. Seventy-five authors responded. Here’s what 12 of them had to say. (Copies of the survey responses can be found at the Paris Review.)

Great responses! Many of the authors told him to do his own research and not to ask them to do the work for him. haha.

(Source: addtoany.com)

aubade:

Victor Hugo’s original handwritten manuscript of Les Misérables.

aubade:

Victor Hugo’s original handwritten manuscript of Les Misérables.

(via fuckyeahmanuscripts)

Welcome to Fuck Yeah Character Development: 60 Awesome Search Engines for Serious Writers

Finding the information you need as a writer shouldn’t be a chore. Luckily, there are plenty of search engines out there that are designed to help you at any stage of the process, from coming up with great ideas to finding a publisher to get your work into print. Both writers still in college…

(Source: writingadvice)